Friday


October 30, 2015
(Schedule Subject to Change)

6:30 a.m. Registration & Exhibits Open

7:00 a.m. Breakfast

7:45 a.m. Welcome & Introduction
Introductions by Richard Katz, M.D., MBA, Chief Medical Officer and VP of Medical Affairs, Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

Welcome by George J. Dover, M.D., Director, Department of Pediatrics, Given Professor of Pediatrics, Professor of Medicine and Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Pediatrician-In-Chief Johns Hopkins Hospital and Steven J. Czinn M.D., Professor and Chairman of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine and Chief of Pediatrics, University of Maryland Medical Center.

8:00 a.m. Keynote Address: Public Health Across the World
Benjamin Caballero, Ph.D, M.D., Professor, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Learning Objectives:
1.Describe the current state of global child health, with emphasis on nutrition and food factors.
2. Identify priorities for reducing child morbidity and mortality worldwide.
3. Specify food and nutrition interventions to promote overall child health, locally and globally.

9:00 a.m. The Role of the Brain in Nutrition
Exploring current research aimed at identifying the roles of various neural signaling pathways in the controls of food intake and body weight.
Timothy Moran, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Learning Objectives:
1. Identify how eating activates satiety signals from the gastrointestinal tract.
2. Recognize the relationship between satiety signaling and hypothalamic pathways involved in energy balance.
3. Describe how reward pathways are activated by both taste and nutrient composition to modulate hypothalamic and satiety signaling.

9:45 a.m. Break

10:15 a.m. The Role of Gut Microbiome
A session overview of the role of the gut microbiome.
Steven J. Czinn M.D., Professor and Chairman of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine and Chief of Pediatrics, University of Maryland Medical Center

Learning Objectives:
1. Identify what the organisms in your biome are doing.
2. Identify how the human biome may regulate immunity.
3. Differentiate how H. pylori infection can prevent asthma and allergies in children.

11:00 a.m. The Role of the GI Tract in Feeding Disorders
Samra S. Blanchard, M.D., University of Maryland School of Medicine

Learning Objectives:
1. Identify the organic causes of feeding disorders.
2. Identify the impact of neurons on the GI tract.
3. Identify available medical treatment options for specific conditions and identify the proper choice for your patient.

11:45 a.m. Buffet Luncheon

12:15 p.m. Luncheon Keynote: What Kids are Eating: Early Development of Dietary Patterns and the Modifiable Factors that Drive Them
Jose (Pepe) M. Saavedra, M.D.,
Global Chief Medical Officer Nestlé Nutrition

Learning Objectives:
1. Review current global data on dietary patterns in infants and young children.
2. Review the environmental and behavioral aspects of feeding associated with diets in infants and young children.
3. Review observational studies on food textures, taste and chewing development.
4. Identify the modifiable factors associated with poor dietary habits and their relationship to obesity.

1:15 p.m. Break

1:45 p.m. What’s Bothering You – Eosinophilic Esophagitis?
A review of the definition and pathophysioloy of eosinophilic esophagitis and a discussion on the clinical presentation and current treatment options of eosinophilic esophagitis
Anjali Malkani, M.D., University of Maryland Medical Center

Learning Objectives:
1. Identify the definition and pathophysiology of eosinophilic esophagitis.
2. Identify the clinical presentation and current treatment options of eosinophilic esophagitis.

2:30 p.m. Conceptualization and treatment of Feeding Disorders from an Anxiety Perspective
A discussion about the psychological aspects of diagnosis and treatment with a focus on the effects of anxiety.
James K. Hyche, Ph.D., Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital
Stacey LeFevre, Psy.D., Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital

Learning Objectives:
1. Recognize the role that anxiety plays in feeding disorders.
2. Recognize how anxiety develops in feeding disorders from a behavioral learning perspective.
3. Identify treatment strategies that address feeding disorders from an anxiety perspective across the developmental continuum.

3:15 p.m. Psychosocial Functioning Among Children with Food Allergies and Their Parents
Linda Herbert, Ph.D., Children’s National Medical Center

Learning Objectives:
1. Identify common psychosocial concerns among children with food allergies and their parents.
2. Recognize how feeding concerns present among children with food allergies.
3. Identify strategies that psychologists can use to help children with food allergies who experience related anxiety/feeding concerns.

3:45 p.m. Break

4:00 p.m. Many Specialists Are Better Than One: The Value of Interdisciplinary Co-Treatment of Pediatric Feeding Issues
Feeding disorders in youth may occur for a variety of reasons. Because a confluence of issues is more often the rule rather than the exception, best practice for intervention should involve an interdisciplinary approach where expertise from multiple fields collaboratively joins together to inform treatment.
Matthew Mychailyszyn, Ph.D.,
Towson University and Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital
Dale Swartos, MS CCC-SLP, Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital
Dorothy Cook, MS, OTR/L, Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital

Learning Objectives:
1. Recognize oral motor/sensory and behavioral features of pediatric feeding disorders.
2. Identify the components and strategies for intervention.
3. Identify the multifaceted causes of feeding disorders and associated importance of coordinating care within an interdisciplinary team.

4:45 p.m.  The BUFFET Program
This presentation will provide an overview of the Building Up Food Flexibility and Exposure Treatment (BUFFET) Program.
Emily Kuschner, Ph.D.
, Radiology, Center for Autism Research, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia

Learning Objectives:
1. Identify feeding problems in school age children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.
2. Have working knowledge of the BUFFET Program and identify various components of the program.
3. Assess the initial feasibility and efficacy of the BUFFET Program based on pilot data for learner’s clinical setting.

5:45 p.m.  Cocktail Reception